All eyes are on next week’s oral arguments in King v. Burwell, the challenge to the availability of tax subsidies for individuals who purchase their health insurance on a marketplace created by the federal government.  I previewed the case earlier this week in Plain English; other coverage and commentary come from David Savage of the Los Angeles Times (registration may be required), Julie Appleby of Kaiser Health News (via Philly.com), Paul Barrett of Bloomberg, Elizabeth Wydra in an op-ed for The Washington Post, Joel Ario, Michael Kolber, and Deborah Bachrach at The Commonwealth Fund Blog, David Nather and Jennifer Haberkorn of Politico Pro, Sarah Kliff of Vox, Larry Levitt and Gary Claxton at the Kaiser Family Foundation, Eric Segall at ACSblog, Jonathan Keim at the National Review Online’s Bench Memos, and Douglas McSwain at ACSblog.

In The Economist, Steven Mazie recaps Wednesday’s oral arguments in EEOC v. Abercrombie & Fitch Stores, the federal government’s challenge to a retail store’s refusal to hire a Muslim teenager because she wore a headscarf.  R. Scott Oswald also comments on the oral arguments for The Employment Law Group.

Coverage of Wednesday’s decision in Yates v. United States, in which the Court invalidated the conviction of a commercial fisherman for destroying undersized fish, comes from Nina Totenberg of NPR, while commentary comes from Jonathan Keim at the National Review Online’s Bench Memos.

Briefly:

  • Ronald Mann has our coverage of Wednesday’s second oral argument, in the bankruptcy fees case Baker Botts L.L.P. v. ASARCO.
  • Lawrence Hurley of Reuters has the latest in the case against protesters who disrupted proceedings at the Court earlier this year – and who say they have no plans to do so again when the Justices hear oral arguments on health care and same-sex marriage.
  • In USA Today, Richard Wolf previews Monday’s oral arguments in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, in which the Court will consider whether the Constitution prohibits the state’s voters from handing over authority for redistricting to independent commissions.
  • At the blog of the National Conference of State Legislatures, Lisa Soronen analyzes Wednesday’s decision in North Carolina Board of Dental Examiners v. FTC, predicting that it “will affect how many of states’ hundreds of agencies, boards, and commissions operate and are governed.”
  • The Missouri Law Review has published a series of tributes to the late Anthony Lewis, who covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times.
  • The Constitutional Accountability Center continues its series on the Roberts Court in its tenth Term, this time with an analysis by David Gans of the Court’s race jurisprudence.
  • At Cato at Liberty, Trevor Burrus discusses the amicus brief that Cato filed in Johnson v. United States, the Armed Career Criminal Act case in which the Court ordered re-argument in January.

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Posted in Round-up

Recommended Citation: Amy Howe, Friday round-up, SCOTUSblog (Feb. 27, 2015, 6:22 AM), https://www.scotusblog.com/2015/02/friday-round-up-259/