Briefly:

  • Greg Stohr reports at Bloomberg that County of Maui, Hawaii v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund, which asks whether the Clean Water Act covers pollution that moves through groundwater before reaching a federal waterway, “could impose major limits on the [statute], giving mines and coal-fired power plants what environmental advocates say would be a new license to pollute.” [Disclosure: Goldstein & Russell, P.C., whose attorneys contribute to this blog in various capacities, is counsel on an amicus brief in support of the respondents in this case.]
  • At The Hill, Harper Neidig reports that the Supreme Court “is poised to rule on a range of controversial political issues in its current term, potentially putting the high court’s broad popularity with the public to the test.”
  • In the latest episode of Law360’s The Term podcast, Jimmy Hoover and Natalie Rodriguez look at the Clean Water Act case, along with Kansas v. Glover, “about why some allegedly common sense traffic stops may be unconstitutional.” [Disclosure: Goldstein & Russell, P.C., whose attorneys contribute to this blog in various capacities, is among the counsel to the respondent in Glover.]
  • At Reason’s Volokh Conspiracy blog, Orrin Kerr “offer[s] a few thoughts about different ways the Justices might approach” Glover.

  • Also at Volokh Conspiracy (via How Appealing), Will Baude passes on Todd Henderson’s thoughts about Sharp v. Murphy, “a complicated murder case involving federal Indian law,” “and the problem that the Supreme Court’s precedents in this area have created for itself.”
  • At the ABA Journal, Erwin Chemerinsky previews Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of the University of California, a challenge to the government’s decision to terminate the DACA program, which allowed immigrants brought to this country illegally as children to apply for protection from deportation.
  • At Townhall, John Bursch weighs in on G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes Inc. v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in which the court will decide whether federal employment discrimination law bars discrimination against transgender people, arguing that “your freedom to rely on what the law says—and much more—may very well depend on the outcome.” [Disclosure: Goldstein & Russell, P.C., whose attorneys contribute to this blog in various capacities, is counsel on an amicus brief in support of respondent Stephens in this case.]

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Posted in Round-up

Recommended Citation: Edith Roberts, Friday round-up, SCOTUSblog (Nov. 1, 2019, 6:56 AM), https://www.scotusblog.com/2019/11/friday-round-up-494/