At its October 18, 2013 Conference, the Court will consider petitions seeking review of issues such as the standing of an objecting class member to challenge a class-certification order, determining qualified immunity based on law at the time of the alleged wrong, and the penalty for non-production of documents overseas.

This edition of “Petitions to watch” features petitions raising issues that Tom has determined to have a reasonable chance of being granted, although we post them here without consideration of whether they present appropriate vehicles in which to decide those issues.  Our policy is to include and disclose all cases in which Goldstein & Russell, P.C., whose attorneys contribute to this blog in various capacities, represents either a party or an amicus in the case, with the exception of the rare cases in which Goldstein & Russell represents the respondent(s) but does not appear on the briefs in the case.

12-1485

Issue: (1) Whether the Second Circuit erred when, in conflict with decisions of this Court and other circuits and in disregard of international comity and due process, it failed to vacate severe sanctions for non-production of records located in countries where production would subject the Bank to criminal penalties, hobbling the Bank’s defense; and (2) whether the courts below erred by failing to dismiss plaintiffs’ Alien Tort Statute claims, as the Second Circuit’s and this Court’s decisions in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum require. CVSG: 10/21/2013.

 

12-1117

Issue: (1) Whether the Sixth Circuit wrongly denied qualified immunity to the petitioners by analyzing whether the force used in 2004 was distinguishable from factually similar force ruled permissible three years later in Scott v. Harris. Stated otherwise, the question presented is whether, for qualified immunity purposes, the Sixth Circuit erred in analyzing whether the force was supported by subsequent case decisions as opposed to prohibited by clearly established law at the time the force was used; and (2) whether the Sixth Circuit erred in denying qualified immunity by finding the use of force was not reasonable as a matter of law when, under the respondent's own facts, the suspect led police officers on a high-speed pursuit that began in Arkansas and ended in Tennessee, the suspect weaved through traffic on an interstate at a high rate of speed and made contact with the police vehicles twice, and the suspect used his vehicle in a final attempt to escape after he was surrounded by police officers, nearly hitting at least one police officer in the process.

 

Relists

 

13-169

Issue: Whether an objecting class member – whose antitrust claims have been waived by a settlement negotiated by class counsel appointed by a racially conscious class-certification order – has standing to challenge the class-certification order and, through it, the antitrust settlement.

 

13-136

Issue: Whether, or in what circumstances, a cy pres remedy that provides no direct relief to class members comports with the requirement of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23(e)(2) that a settlement that binds class members must be “fair, reasonable, and adequate.”

 

13-95

Issue: (1) Whether the state forfeits an argument that Stone v. Powell bars habeas relief if the state fails to raise Stone in the district court, or whether Stone announced a categorical rule that Fourth Amendment claims are not cognizable on habeas review absent a showing that the state prisoner was denied a full and fair opportunity to litigate the issue in state court; (2) whether the decision of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, in relying on studies that were not part of the state court record, conflicts with this Court's decision in Cullen v. Pinholster, which held that habeas review is limited to the record that was before the state court; and (3) whether the decision of the Second Circuit affords the state court the deference required by 28 U.S.C § 2254(d), as interpreted by this Court in Harrington v. Richter.

 

12-10882

Issue: Whether the Florida scheme for identifying mentally retarded defendants in capital cases violates Atkins v. Virginia.

 

12-1480

Issue: (1) Whether a state-court order denying a request for relief on a constitutional claim “for lack of merit in the grounds presented” constitutes a merits adjudication of that claim for purposes of the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 (AEDPA); and (2) whether a federal habeas court may, consistent with AEDPA, delve into the internal procedures of a state court to support its speculation that an order denying relief “for lack of merit” is not, in fact, a merits adjudication.

 

12-1472

Issue: Whether, under the Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA), state court adjudications are per se unreasonable and not entitled to deference under 28 U.S.C. § 2254(d)(2) merely because the state court does not conduct an evidentiary hearing.

 

12-1401

Issue: Whether consumers have standing to challenge the constitutionality of laws regulating the sale of firearms.

 

12-1217

Issue: (1) Whether the “hot pursuit” doctrine articulated in United States v. Santana applies where police officers seek to arrest a fleeing suspect for a misdemeanor; and (2) whether a police officer is entitled to qualified immunity where he pursued a suspect fleeing the officer’s attempt to arrest him for a jailable misdemeanor committed in the officer’s presence, into the front yard of a residence through a gate used to access the front door, and the officer had reason to believe the suspect might have been just involved in a fight involving weapons.

 

Posted in Cases in the Pipeline

Recommended Citation: Mary Pat Dwyer, Petitions to watch | Conference of October 18, SCOTUSblog (Oct. 16, 2013, 9:31 AM), http://www.scotusblog.com/2013/10/petitions-to-watch-conference-of-october-18/