Coverage of the Court looks ahead to next week’s oral arguments in Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs, in which the Justices will consider whether juveniles convicted of murder can be sentenced to life in prison without parole. Lyle Denniston previews both cases for this blog, while Sentencing Law and Policy focuses on Michigan’s interests in the issue.

Elsewhere, all Court-watching eyes seem to be on this month’s arguments in the challenges to the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act.  At the Washington Post, Sarah Kliff answers seven frequently asked questions about the Affordable Care Act litigation, while Politico has a series of guest editorials about the Court and the challenges to the Act from (among others) Scott Atlas and Robert Schapiro, with the latter noting that the ACA litigation is “a throwback to an older style of case…[that] has the potential to reinject the Court into pressing matters of social and economic policy.”

Coverage of the litigation also extends to two of the advocates, Paul Clement and Donald Verrilli, as they prepare for oral argument. Greg Stohr of Bloomberg profiles Clement, describing him as “poised to make a deeper imprint on American law this year than anyone without the title ‘justice,’” because of his role as the “go-to” lawyer for conservatives. Mark Sherman also profiles Clement for the Associated Press, while Pete Yost of the Associated Press does the same for Verrilli.

Briefly:

  • At the Boston Review, Pamela Karlan discusses a “troubling trend” in the Court’s approach to civil rights and civil liberties.
  • At Dorf on Law, Mike Dorf examines the impact of actual facts on Supreme Court cases, arguing that “judicial truthiness, not the real truth, matters to the law.”
  • Ron Collins of this blog provides a listing of all 351 books written or edited by Justices of the Court.
  • At PrawfsBlawg, Michael Mannheimer asks how professors should teach United States v. Jones.

Posted in Round-up

Recommended Citation: Nabiha Syed, Tuesday round-up, SCOTUSblog (Mar. 13, 2012, 11:12 AM), http://www.scotusblog.com/2012/03/tuesday-round-up-114/