Editor's Note :

Editor's Note :

In previous years, the Court released orders the morning after the Court’s “Long Conference.” It has not done so this year. Beginning last Term, the Court consistently considered petitions at least two times before granting certiorari. To the extent that practice continues -- and there is no affirmative evidence the Court intends to drop it -- we would not expect orders granting certiorari today.

Steve Vladeck Guest

Stephen I. Vladeck is a Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law. His teaching and research focus on federal jurisdiction, constitutional law (especially the separation of powers), national security law, and international criminal law.

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06.12.12 Opinion analysis: A brand-new (and “absolutely weird”) theory of judicial review
03.21.12 Opinion analysis: A new remedy, but no right
03.01.12 Argument summary: Facial challenges, the MSPB, and an “absolutely weird” theory of administrative review
02.17.12 Argument preview: The CSRA and the right to vindicate constitutional claims
10.05.11 Argument recap: An Arizona-specific right to collateral post-conviction counsel?
09.29.11 Martinez v. Ryan argument preview: Direct vs. collateral review and the theory behind the right to counsel
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