Editor's Note :

Editor's Note :

In previous years, the Court released orders the morning after the Court’s “Long Conference.” It has not done so this year. Beginning last Term, the Court consistently considered petitions at least two times before granting certiorari. To the extent that practice continues -- and there is no affirmative evidence the Court intends to drop it -- we would not expect orders granting certiorari today.

Rory Little Criminal Law

Rory Little is a Professor of Law at U.C. Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, a former clerk to Justices Stewart (ret.) and Brennan, and author of the American Bar Association’s “Annual Review of the Supreme Court’s Term, Criminal Cases.” He is also “Of Counsel” to the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery on discrete appellate matters.

Date Post Title
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01.11.13 Argument preview: Stick to the (Speedy Trial) question presented?
12.04.12 Argument recap: Trying to discern a timing rule for a rule that says nothing about timing
11.26.12 Argument preview: Not-so-plain questions about plain error
11.11.11 Opinion analysis: The Court quickly disposes of “Twilight Zone” habeas arguments
10.14.11 Argument recap: Arguing in the Twilight Zone is no easy task
10.08.11 Argument preview: Journey to the Twilight Zone: When does a state’s obligation to consider “clearly established” law end?
05.07.10 Justice Stevens’ Commitment to Prosecutorial Ethics
Term Snapshot
Awards