Editor's Note :

Editor's Note :

In previous years, the Court released orders the morning after the Court’s “Long Conference.” It has not done so this year. Beginning last Term, the Court consistently considered petitions at least two times before granting certiorari. To the extent that practice continues -- and there is no affirmative evidence the Court intends to drop it -- we would not expect orders granting certiorari today.

Rory Little Criminal Law

Rory Little is a Professor of Law at U.C. Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, a former clerk to Justices Stewart (ret.) and Brennan, and author of the American Bar Association’s “Annual Review of the Supreme Court’s Term, Criminal Cases.” He is also “Of Counsel” to the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery on discrete appellate matters.

Date Post Title
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06.23.14 Opinion analysis: Court clarifies reach of federal bank fraud while leaving some questions for future
04.03.14 Argument report: Reach of the federal bank fraud statute remains unclear
03.30.14 Argument preview: No April Fools – Even after thirty years, the reach of the federal bank fraud statute is hard to predict
03.06.14 Opinion analysis: Justice Kagan writes a primer on aiding and abetting law
02.25.14 Opinion analysis: The Court narrowly limits a precedent allowing co-occupant objections to warrantless consent searches
11.14.13 Argument recap: Court seems poised to limit Georgia v. Randolph to “physically present” co-tenants
11.13.13 Argument recap: A likely win for the aider and abetter who lacks purpose
11.11.13 Argument preview: Law school hypos about criminal law mens rea
11.06.13 Opinion analysis: Court says more about federal habeas review than ineffective assistance in plea bargaining
10.09.13 Argument analysis: State seems likely to prevail in plea-bargaining case
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