At CNN, Ariane de Vogue reports on how the Supreme Court’s recent same-sex marriage case, Obergefell v. Hodges, may play out next term in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, which stems from a baker’s refusal to create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. In the Washington Examiner, Ryan Lovelace notes that “[a] flurry of religious liberty challenges headed toward the Supreme Court in its upcoming term,” including Masterpiece Cakeshop, “could leave a lasting mark on American law for years to come.”

Briefly:

  • At Howe on the Court, Amy Howe looks at several of the cases the justices will consider when they reconvene on September 25 for their first conference after the summer recess, including Adhikari v. Kellogg Brown & Root, which involves the Alien Tort Statute; Fourth Amendment cases Collins v. Virginia and Aksu v. California; and a double-jeopardy case, Currier v. Virginia.
  • An Election Law Blog podcast on the upcoming partisan-gerrymandering case, Gill v. Whitford, features the architects of the “efficiency gap,” a metric that may offer “a manageable standard to decide when there’s too much politics in redistricting.”
  • At Empirical SCOTUS, Adam Feldman analyzes the federal government’s Supreme Court litigation over the past several terms, concluding that the office of the solicitor general “has not been the paragon of success before the Court that it is and was often assumed to be.”

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Posted in Round-up

Recommended Citation: Edith Roberts, Tuesday round-up, SCOTUSblog (Sep. 5, 2017, 7:34 AM), http://www.scotusblog.com/2017/09/tuesday-round-up-393/