This morning the Court released opinions in five cases. In Utah v. Strieff, the Court ruled that that methamphetamines and drug paraphernalia found in a search conducted after a Utah man had been arrested could be used against him even though the warrant for his arrest was discovered as the result of an illegal stop.  Early coverage comes from Tal Kopan of CNN, Adam Liptak of The New York Times, Richard Wolf of USA Today, Robert Barnes of The Washington Post, David G. Savage of the Los Angeles Times, the Associated Press, Chris Geidner of BuzzFeed, Debra Cassens Weiss of ABA Journal, David Smith of The Guardian, and Cristian Farias of Huffington Post.

Commentary on the opinion comes from Tim Cushing at TechDirt, Lisa Soronen for International Municipal Lawyers Association, Avia Shen of ThinkProgress, Jonathan Blanks for Cato at Liberty, Victoria Massie of Vox, Noah Feldman of Bloomberg View, Stephanie Mencimer of Mother Jones, and Mark Joseph Stern of Slate.

In RJR Nabisco, Inc. v. The European Community, the Court ruled in favor of tobacco giant RJR in the RICO suit filed against it by the European Community, which alleged that the company was part of an international money-laundering scheme; the Court concluded that, although RICO can apply to some conduct that occurs overseas, private plaintiffs must also show an injury in the United States.  Coverage of the opinion comes from Amy Howe for this blog,  Brent Kendall of The Wall Street Journal, Lawrence Hurley of Reuters, Greg Stohr of Bloomberg, Sam Hananel of the Associated Press, Debra Cassens Weiss of ABA Journal, with commentary from Ellen Podgor for White Collar Crime Prof Blog.

The Court also issued an opinion in Cuozzo Speed Technologies, LLC v. Lee, finding that the Patent Office can apply the “broadest reasonable interpretation” standard in inter partes review. Coverage of this opinion comes from Brent Kendall at The Wall Street Journal, Lawrence Hurley and Andrew Chung of Reuters, the Associated Press, Debra Cassens Weiss of ABA Journal, and Greg Stohr of Bloomberg.

The Court also issued orders from last week’s conference this morning, adding two new cases to its docket for next fall. One new case involves the right to a bail hearing for foreign nationals in immigration detention, and the other involves authority of senior temporary government officials. Lyle Denniston has our coverage of those grants here. Other coverage comes from Jess Bravin of The Wall Street Journal, as well as Brent Kendall, Lawrence Hurley of Reuters,  Sam Hananel of the Associated Press, who wrote separately on both grants, Josh Gerstein of Politico, Lydia Wheeler of The Hill, who wrote separately on both grants, and Greg Stohr of Bloomberg, who also wrote separately on both grants.

Also in this morning’s orders, the Court declined to review a challenge to state bans on assault weapons in Connecticut and New York.  Coverage of the denial comes from Joe Palazzolo of The Wall Street Journal, Lawrence Hurley of Reuters, Ariane de Vogue of CNN, Pete Williams of NBC News, the Associated Press, Louis Nelson of Politico, Debra Cassens Weiss of ABA Journal, Cristian Farias of Huffington Post, Lydia Wheeler of The Hill, Robert Barnes of The Washington Post, David G. Savage of the Los Angeles Times, and Greg Stohr of Bloomberg.

Commentary on the denial comes from Krishnadev Calamur for The Atlantic.

Posted in Round-up

Recommended Citation: Molly Runkle, Evening round-up: Today’s orders and opinions, SCOTUSblog (Jun. 20, 2016, 8:22 PM), http://www.scotusblog.com/2016/06/evening-round-up-todays-orders-and-opinions/